Merrily Fanthing Along

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blacksquares:

callingoutbigotry:

These leafdogs soothe my soul

this is the highest level of wizard

(Source: mostlydogsmostly)

Can you point me in the direction of articles on the linguistics of the internet? I like analyses of changes in syntax and meaning and grammar, and how that relates to the differing culture of different sections of the internet. Have you seen anything like that? Or can you ramble on your own observations (even though you work with sounds, not syntax)?

s-cornelius:

bothslashneither:

s-cornelius:

Ehhh. I’m a really terrible resource for that sort of thing. I know that sort of work exists (in fact, one of my friends in my program does a little with syntax and pragmatics of tweeting), but I wouldn’t even know where to begin to point you in the right direction.

And while I’ve taken a whole host of syntax classes, observations about syntax don’t come naturally to me, so I haven’t really thought a lot about syntax as it relates to internet-speak and the low register of social media.

Really what fascinates me is the use of punctuation to affect prosody, i.e. the use of a ‘?’ to indicate rising intonation, rather than an actual question. So, yea, sound stuff. :)

Also, when I’m looking for articles on a topic I’m interested in, a lot of times I just use Google. What’s nice about Google is that if it brings up an article, you can see where its been cited and you can start to build up a bibliography on that topic. Also, if you have access to it through a library or institution, the LLBA (Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts) is your best friend for finding articles. 

Hope that helps! Sorry I’m so useless on this topic haha.

Gretchen McCulloch has written articles about doge grammar and fake Benedict Cumberbatch names. Tia Baheri wrote an article about the ability to can even. Rebecca Cohen wrote an article about the question mark disappearing. Ben Crair wrote an article about angry periods. Anne Curzan wrote about slash as a conjunction. And Megan Garber wrote about because as a preposition. Just to name a few. If you track the linguistics tag, these types of articles get posted sometimes.

Here you go, anon! (Now that I see all these together, I have actually read all of these oops)

culinarygriffin:

Butter Drop Biscuits
This is a super quick, super easy recipe for soft, fluffy, crumbly biscuits that are perfect for all your biscuity needs. I found this recipe in a book called Fast Breads by Susie Cushner, but I’ll be adding some notes for substitutions and conversions along the way.
These biscuits are melt-in-your-mouth good, and are perfect with butter, cream or jam! They would also pair perfectly with soups and chili, or maybe just some gravy for a hearty Southern breakfast.
Yield: Makes 6 large biscuits.
Prep Time: 5 minutes.
Cook Time: 475F for 10 - 12 minutes.
INGREDIENTS:
6 tbsp unsalted butter
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup cake flour (Substitute: 1/4 cup all-purpose flour)
1 tbsp granulated sugar
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp kosher salt (Substitute: 1/2 tsp table salt)
1/4 cup cold shortening, cut into pieces (Substitute: 1/4 cup unsalted butter)
1 cup cold buttermilk, any fat content (Substitute: 1 cup cold milk with 1 tbsp unsalted butter added to the flour mixture)
Notes: Cake flour is ground finer for a softer feel, and gives these biscuits an even softer texture, almost cake-like. I made these biscuits with most of the substitutions noted, and they were still fabulous.
INSTRUCTIONS:
Position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 475F (245C).
In a heavy, 9-in ovenproof frying pan, melt the 6 tbsp of butter over low heat, and set aside. OR, melt the butter in a standard pie dish in the oven. Remove when butter is fully melted, and set aside.
Sift both flours, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a large bowl. Scatter the shortening (or butter) over the top. Using your fingers or a pastry blender, work the shortening into the flour. There will still be loose flour.
Make a well in the center, pour in the buttermilk (or regular milk), and mix into the dry ingredients to form a soft dough.
Using a 1/4 cup capacity ice cream scoop, or a large spoon, drop 6 rounded scoops of dough into the prepared pan, spacing them about 1/2 inch apart. (Drop 5 biscuits around the edge, with one in the center.) Using the large spoon, carefully turn each biscuit to coat both sides with butter.
Bake until the tops are golden, about 10 to 12 minutes, depending on your oven. Serve warm, directly from the pan!
These biscuits can be baked ahead of time, up to 3 hours in advance and left in the pan, covered loosely with aluminum foil. To serve, preheat the oven to 275F (135C) and reheat the covered biscuits until warm, about 10 minutes.
That’s all! Share and enjoy. :)

culinarygriffin:

Butter Drop Biscuits

This is a super quick, super easy recipe for soft, fluffy, crumbly biscuits that are perfect for all your biscuity needs. I found this recipe in a book called Fast Breads by Susie Cushner, but I’ll be adding some notes for substitutions and conversions along the way.

These biscuits are melt-in-your-mouth good, and are perfect with butter, cream or jam! They would also pair perfectly with soups and chili, or maybe just some gravy for a hearty Southern breakfast.

Yield: Makes 6 large biscuits.

Prep Time: 5 minutes.

Cook Time: 475F for 10 - 12 minutes.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 6 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup cake flour (Substitute: 1/4 cup all-purpose flour)
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp kosher salt (Substitute: 1/2 tsp table salt)
  • 1/4 cup cold shortening, cut into pieces (Substitute: 1/4 cup unsalted butter)
  • 1 cup cold buttermilk, any fat content (Substitute: 1 cup cold milk with 1 tbsp unsalted butter added to the flour mixture)

Notes: Cake flour is ground finer for a softer feel, and gives these biscuits an even softer texture, almost cake-like. I made these biscuits with most of the substitutions noted, and they were still fabulous.

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 475F (245C).
  2. In a heavy, 9-in ovenproof frying pan, melt the 6 tbsp of butter over low heat, and set aside. OR, melt the butter in a standard pie dish in the oven. Remove when butter is fully melted, and set aside.
  3. Sift both flours, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a large bowl. Scatter the shortening (or butter) over the top. Using your fingers or a pastry blender, work the shortening into the flour. There will still be loose flour.
  4. Make a well in the center, pour in the buttermilk (or regular milk), and mix into the dry ingredients to form a soft dough.
  5. Using a 1/4 cup capacity ice cream scoop, or a large spoon, drop 6 rounded scoops of dough into the prepared pan, spacing them about 1/2 inch apart. (Drop 5 biscuits around the edge, with one in the center.) Using the large spoon, carefully turn each biscuit to coat both sides with butter.
  6. Bake until the tops are golden, about 10 to 12 minutes, depending on your oven. Serve warm, directly from the pan!
  7. These biscuits can be baked ahead of time, up to 3 hours in advance and left in the pan, covered loosely with aluminum foil. To serve, preheat the oven to 275F (135C) and reheat the covered biscuits until warm, about 10 minutes.

That’s all! Share and enjoy. :)

diacrit:

hanesonly:

I almost forgot my briefcase!

it contains important lab results

diacrit:

hanesonly:

I almost forgot my briefcase!

it contains important lab results

(Source: awwww-cute)

cinemagorgeous:

Gorgeous concept art for GRAVITY RUSH by artist Takeshi Oga.

falloutmagiboy:

this is your daily reminder to not forget about ferguson. Keep it going!

(Source: falloutstar)

tiny-creatures:

Under a curtain by lieveheersbeestje

tiny-creatures:

Under a curtain by lieveheersbeestje

pbsparents:

Calligraphy Animals by Andrew Fox
(via) 

pbsparents:

Calligraphy Animals by Andrew Fox

(via

ladyinterior:

Magnificent Trees Around the World

biomorphosis:

The bat-eared fox is named for its huge ears, which can grow to be more than five inches long and stand out much like the ears on a bat. These foxes live in family units and typically eat insects to survive. 
This amazing animal can eat more than a million termites per year and can actually help control the termite population. They rarely drink water because they are able to hydrate with all the bugs they eat.

biomorphosis:

The bat-eared fox is named for its huge ears, which can grow to be more than five inches long and stand out much like the ears on a bat. These foxes live in family units and typically eat insects to survive. 

This amazing animal can eat more than a million termites per year and can actually help control the termite population. They rarely drink water because they are able to hydrate with all the bugs they eat.