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Posts tagged with "Canada"

Jun 5

PWYC Breast Forms and Bras!

xcedarxsmoke:

xcedarxsmoke:

Union for Gender Empowerment Breast Form & Bra Pilot Project! This project aims to make breast forms and bras more accessible to trans women and trans feminine folks. Breast forms can cost upwards of $200(!) and the project offer a a variety of breast forms, body-tailored, and at a pay-what-you-can rate out of our co-op!

hey folks, this is the by-donation Breast Form and Bra pilot project we’ve launched with the UGE - now with a webpage and order form and everything!
we’re based out of montreal, and generally cater to folks in the city, but for more info feel free to contact us at unionforgenderempowerment@gmail.com !

**please reblog and signal boost to get the word out** 

we’re really stoked to be offering this service pwyc/by-donation and helping in making gender empowerment items for trans women and trans feminine folks more accessible(!)

reblobbin’ again because I keep seeing giveaways and contests etc. for breast forms that have 30,000+ notes and this is basically *like* that, except you get breast forms / undergarments every. single. time. cuz there’s no draw! cuz you can order them through us at whatever price you can afford (which can be $0)! OK!

Apr 6
thepeoplesrecord:

Aboriginal rights a threat to Canada’s natural resource agenda, documents revealMarch 3, 2014
The Canadian government is increasingly worried that the growing clout of aboriginal peoples’ rights could obstruct its aggressive resource development plans, documents reveal.
Since 2008, the Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs has run a risk management program to evaluate and respond to “significant risks” to its agenda, including assertions of treaty rights, the rising expectations of aboriginal peoples, and new legal precedents at odds with the government’s policies.
Yearly government reports obtained by the Guardian predict that the failure to manage the risks could result in more “adversarial relations” with aboriginal peoples, “public outcry and negative international attention,” and “economic development projects [being] delayed.”
“There is a risk that the legal landscape can undermine the ability of the department to move forward in its policy agenda,” one Aboriginal Affairs’ report says. “There is a tension between the rights-based agenda of Aboriginal groups and the non-rights based policy approaches” of the federal government.
The Conservative government is planning in the next ten years to attract $650 billion of investment to mining, forestry, gas and oil projects, much of it on or near traditional aboriginal lands.
Critics say the government is determined to evade Supreme Court rulings that recognize aboriginal peoples’ rights to a decision-making role in, even in some cases jurisdiction over, resource development in large areas of the country.
“The Harper government is committed to a policy of extinguishing indigenous peoples’ land rights, instead of a policy of recognition and co-existence,” said Arthur Manuel, chair of the Indigenous Network on Economies and Trade, which has lead an effort to have the economic implications of aboriginal rights identified as a financial risk.
“They are trying to contain the threat that our rights pose to business-as-usual and the expansion of dirty energy projects. But our legal challenges and direct actions are creating economic uncertainty and risk, raising the heat on the government to change its current policies.”
A spokesperson for the Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs declined to answer the Guardian’s questions, but sent a response saying the risk reports are compiled from internal reviews and “targeted interviews with senior management in those areas experiencing significant change.”
“The [corporate risk profile] is designed as an analytical tool for planning and not a public document. A good deal of [its] content would only be understandable to those working for the department as it speaks to the details of the operations of specific programs.”
Last year Canada was swept by the aboriginal-led Idle No More protest movement, building on years of aboriginal struggles against resource projects, the most high-profile of which has targeted Enbridge’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline that would carry Alberta tar sands to the western coast of British Columbia.
“Native land claims scare the hell out of investors,” an analyst with global risk consultancy firm Eurasia Group has noted, concluding that First Nations opposition and legal standing has dramatically decreased the chances the Enbridge pipeline will be built.
In British Columbia and across the country, aboriginal peoples’ new assertiveness has been backed by successive victories in the courts.
According to a report released in November by Virginia-based First Peoples Worldwide, the risk associated with not respecting aboriginal peoples’ rights over lands and resources is emerging as a new financial bubble for extractive industries.
The report anticipates that as aboriginal peoples become better connected through digital media, win broader public support, and mount campaigns that more effectively impact business profits, failures to uphold aboriginal rights will carry an even higher risk.
The Aboriginal Affairs’ documents describe how a special legal branch helps the Ministry monitor and “mitigate” the risks posed by aboriginal court cases.
The federal government has spent far more fighting aboriginal litigation than any other legal issue – including $106 million in 2013, a sum that has grown over the last several years.
A special envoy appointed in 2013 by the Harper government to address First Nations opposition to energy projects in western Canada recentlyrecommended that the federal government move rapidly to improve consultation and dialogue.
To boost support for its agenda, the government has considered offeringbonds to allow First Nations to take equity stakes in resource projects. This is part of a rising trend of provincial governments and companies signing “benefit-sharing” agreements with First Nations to gain access to their lands, while falling short of any kind of recognition of aboriginal rights or jurisdiction.
Since 2007, the government has also turned to increased spying, creating a surveillance program aimed at aboriginal communities deemed “hot spots” because of their involvement in protest and civil disobedience against unwanted extraction on their lands.
Over the last year, the Harper government has cut funding to national, regional and tribal aboriginal organizations that provide legal services and advocate politically on behalf of First Nations, raising cries that it is trying to silence growing dissent.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Aboriginal rights a threat to Canada’s natural resource agenda, documents reveal
March 3, 2014

The Canadian government is increasingly worried that the growing clout of aboriginal peoples’ rights could obstruct its aggressive resource development plans, documents reveal.

Since 2008, the Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs has run a risk management program to evaluate and respond to “significant risks” to its agenda, including assertions of treaty rights, the rising expectations of aboriginal peoples, and new legal precedents at odds with the government’s policies.

Yearly government reports obtained by the Guardian predict that the failure to manage the risks could result in more “adversarial relations” with aboriginal peoples, “public outcry and negative international attention,” and “economic development projects [being] delayed.”

“There is a risk that the legal landscape can undermine the ability of the department to move forward in its policy agenda,” one Aboriginal Affairs’ report says. “There is a tension between the rights-based agenda of Aboriginal groups and the non-rights based policy approaches” of the federal government.

The Conservative government is planning in the next ten years to attract $650 billion of investment to mining, forestry, gas and oil projects, much of it on or near traditional aboriginal lands.

Critics say the government is determined to evade Supreme Court rulings that recognize aboriginal peoples’ rights to a decision-making role in, even in some cases jurisdiction over, resource development in large areas of the country.

“The Harper government is committed to a policy of extinguishing indigenous peoples’ land rights, instead of a policy of recognition and co-existence,” said Arthur Manuel, chair of the Indigenous Network on Economies and Trade, which has lead an effort to have the economic implications of aboriginal rights identified as a financial risk.

“They are trying to contain the threat that our rights pose to business-as-usual and the expansion of dirty energy projects. But our legal challenges and direct actions are creating economic uncertainty and risk, raising the heat on the government to change its current policies.”

A spokesperson for the Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs declined to answer the Guardian’s questions, but sent a response saying the risk reports are compiled from internal reviews and “targeted interviews with senior management in those areas experiencing significant change.”

“The [corporate risk profile] is designed as an analytical tool for planning and not a public document. A good deal of [its] content would only be understandable to those working for the department as it speaks to the details of the operations of specific programs.”

Last year Canada was swept by the aboriginal-led Idle No More protest movement, building on years of aboriginal struggles against resource projects, the most high-profile of which has targeted Enbridge’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline that would carry Alberta tar sands to the western coast of British Columbia.

“Native land claims scare the hell out of investors,” an analyst with global risk consultancy firm Eurasia Group has noted, concluding that First Nations opposition and legal standing has dramatically decreased the chances the Enbridge pipeline will be built.

In British Columbia and across the country, aboriginal peoples’ new assertiveness has been backed by successive victories in the courts.

According to a report released in November by Virginia-based First Peoples Worldwide, the risk associated with not respecting aboriginal peoples’ rights over lands and resources is emerging as a new financial bubble for extractive industries.

The report anticipates that as aboriginal peoples become better connected through digital media, win broader public support, and mount campaigns that more effectively impact business profits, failures to uphold aboriginal rights will carry an even higher risk.

The Aboriginal Affairs’ documents describe how a special legal branch helps the Ministry monitor and “mitigate” the risks posed by aboriginal court cases.

The federal government has spent far more fighting aboriginal litigation than any other legal issue – including $106 million in 2013, a sum that has grown over the last several years.

A special envoy appointed in 2013 by the Harper government to address First Nations opposition to energy projects in western Canada recentlyrecommended that the federal government move rapidly to improve consultation and dialogue.

To boost support for its agenda, the government has considered offeringbonds to allow First Nations to take equity stakes in resource projects. This is part of a rising trend of provincial governments and companies signing “benefit-sharing” agreements with First Nations to gain access to their lands, while falling short of any kind of recognition of aboriginal rights or jurisdiction.

Since 2007, the government has also turned to increased spying, creating a surveillance program aimed at aboriginal communities deemed “hot spots” because of their involvement in protest and civil disobedience against unwanted extraction on their lands.

Over the last year, the Harper government has cut funding to national, regional and tribal aboriginal organizations that provide legal services and advocate politically on behalf of First Nations, raising cries that it is trying to silence growing dissent.

Source

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

New database lists 824 murdered, missing native women in Canada

cpt-ajt:

"…That’s significantly higher than the widely used and often-criticized number of 582, cobbled together by the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC).

The NWAC’s list was never public and could not be scrutinized or validated, but it helped catapult the issue of violence against indigenous women onto the national agenda.

The new research, which dug deeper into the past and the public record, shows the number of missing and murdered aboriginal women in Manitoba is 111, up from NWAC’s oft-quoted figure of 79.”

Mar 7
centraljerseysky:

abseunt:

Niagara Falls, Canada

This is beautiful holy crAp

centraljerseysky:

abseunt:

Niagara Falls, Canada

This is beautiful holy crAp

Jan 4
woodendreams:

(by Ireena Eleonora Worthy)

woodendreams:

(by Ireena Eleonora Worthy)

alotofpoltergeists:

little—-kitten:

alotofpoltergeists:

sweet geez do i need to go find those two posts and reblog them again?

the one about how ppl need to stop being all “omg i can’t believe THIS is happening in 2013!!!”?

and the one abt how canada is not some happy cosy nice liberal paradise?

cuz fuck. i assure you, no canadian with their heads even marginally out of their asses is at all surprised by shit thats going down in Elsipogtog - definitely no one old enough to remember Oka is surprised.

Canada. Is. An. Actively. Colonial. State.

(And the idea of progress is false as fuck and the idea of progress being inherent with time is doubly false.)

Canada is an ACTIVELY COLONIAL state.

We aren’t even 100 years past the age of the Empire. We are STILL a member of the “Commonwealth”. What was essentially or literally first contact with the Inuit and other native people in the Arctic occurred /within the lifetimes of people still alive today/. The Canadian State BARELY recognizes or acknowledges any of the Treaties between indigenous Nations and the Crown and is ALWAYS AND CONSISTENTLY trying to go back on or ignore them - especially out east here, home to the oldest ones.

The last RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL was closed in MY lifetime - the last of a program begun in the late 19th century.

There is no sharp divide between past and present.

And Canada. Is. An. Actively. Colonial. State.

so stfu with acting all appalled and surprised bc in this day and age!!! especially if you are NOT Canadian or First Nations/Metis/Inuit.

Residential schools were such a recent thing. People like to pretend that they’re this far of part of history but my grandfather and his siblings went to residential schools. It was not that long ago.

Yep. :/ (For context for anyone who doesn’t know my age, I was born in 1992. Last Canadian residential school closed in 1996, IIRC.)

(Source: alackofpetticoats)

Oct 5
onsomething:

onsomething

Viljo Revell + Heikki Castrén, Bengt Lundsten, Seppo Valjus | Toronto City Hall, 1961-65
Via 1

onsomething:

onsomething

Viljo Revell + Heikki Castrén, Bengt Lundsten, Seppo Valjus | Toronto City Hall, 1961-65

Via 1

Oct 4
elementalsight:

its-war-machine-rox:

so this just happened
*posts not mine

Best combination ever.
Also, the robbery was a real thing.

elementalsight:

its-war-machine-rox:

so this just happened

*posts not mine

Best combination ever.

Also, the robbery was a real thing.

(Source: heyassbuttss)

behindthesefangirleyes:

suklaaaa:

bunnyinafez:

iwantfitbody:

madamedepompador:

winchesterwolves:

moniker-padacklyte:

zillystring:

wasereborworthit:

mellowminty:

pizzaforpresident:

petition to rename the usa ‘south canada’

what about alaska

are we then normal canada

canada a bit to the left

image


What about South America? Is that just America? Or South South Canada?

image

image

i cried my ass of laughing

image

WARM CANADA

i caN’T BREATHE OH MY GOD

Not-a-Single-Lady Canada kills me every time!

woodendreams:

(by Jeff Clow)

woodendreams:

(by Jeff Clow)