Merrily Fanthing Along

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Posts tagged with "and now for moth's tags"

urbangreens:

Patio green wall
Love the grass tiles
via kliniczero

urbangreens:

Patio green wall

Love the grass tiles

via kliniczero

isaac-hawthorne:

justamerplwithabox:

vivelafat:

prokopetz:

officialdeadparrot:

grellholmes:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 
Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.
On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.
The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”
And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:
[stifled giggling]
[reeeeeeally deep breath]
[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]
The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.
In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”
FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of all that is holy why would you put it in a tuba part.

This is the best band post 
Everyone else go home

Oh man, so I play trombone, and we got this piece called Florentiner Marsch by Julius Fucik, and we saw this

which is 8 fortes. We were shocked until,

that is 24 fortes who the fuck does that

Who does that?

This guy. Take a good look - that is the moustache of a man with nothing to lose.

Julius IdontgivaFucik

More like Julius Fuckit

"Nichts für Lauwarmduscher" - I died. Because truth.
(Explanation: It means ‘this is not for people who shower lukewarm’, and calling someone a person who showers with warm water is a common “insult” in German, as only people showering with cold water are true badasses.)

isaac-hawthorne:

justamerplwithabox:

vivelafat:

prokopetz:

officialdeadparrot:

grellholmes:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 

Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.

On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.

The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”

And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:

[stifled giggling]

[reeeeeeally deep breath]

[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]

The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.

In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”

FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of all that is holy why would you put it in a tuba part.

This is the best band post 

Everyone else go home

Oh man, so I play trombone, and we got this piece called Florentiner Marsch by Julius Fucik, and we saw this

image

which is 8 fortes. We were shocked until,

image

that is 24 fortes who the fuck does that

Who does that?

This guy. Take a good look - that is the moustache of a man with nothing to lose.

Julius IdontgivaFucik

More like Julius Fuckit

"Nichts für Lauwarmduscher" - I died. Because truth.

(Explanation: It means ‘this is not for people who shower lukewarm’, and calling someone a person who showers with warm water is a common “insult” in German, as only people showering with cold water are true badasses.)

(Source: housecatincarnate)

ceeberoni:

Rose saw beauty in everything.

ceeberoni:

Rose saw beauty in everything.

3liza:

xxxemoghoul69xxx:

markusbones:

xemoboyfriendx:

nudiemuse:

bedbugsbiting:

sqbr:

squiddishly:

squiddishly:

yiduiqie:

isabelthespy:

rgr-pop:

isabelthespy:

noplaceforhatefucking:

fuckyeahcraft:

Yarn Bombed (by RhubarbPatch)
Some lovely cheerful yarn bombing!

Ugh, guys, don’t do this, never do this, some person or people yarn bomb periodically all over my fucking neighborhood and never come back and check on their shit and now there’s just faded, raveling, mouldering yarn clumps on lampposts and fenceposts and trees that mostly looked just fine before being “reclaimed” and it makes me embarrassed about how grungy and derelict, say, the lot on my corner, or the sidewalk up the block, now seems
(also, the posts and poles used to be available for posters and fliers and now aren’t because guess what you can’t tape a show or sale poster to the fucking gross mildewed yarn things, so you’ve actually decreased useful community space, thanks so much)

never not reblogging yarn bombing hate

who the fuck can even afford to abandon that much yarn, yarn is like one of the less cheap craft supplies, to me yarnbombing is a form of conspicuous consumption like lawns and truffle fries (except not like truffle fries because truffle fries are fucking cool)

literally never not reblogging yarn bombing hate/this is another really really good point, even if this is like lion’s brand acrylic that adds up a lot for one of those trees much less all of them

i loathe yarn bombing, so +1. 
in australia a lot of yarn bombing takes place on private property, so i wonder if that contributes to the fact that i haven’t seen any gross decaying yarn bombs?

I’ve seen plenty of decaying yarnbombing around the northern end of Coburg.  It’s gross and wasteful.  And, to reiterate, bad for trees.

FURTHER THOUGHTS REGARDING MY HATRED OF YARN BOMBING, because I just angrily ate my breakfast and remembered this: 
So, Moreland City Council sponsored a yarn bombing thing outside the Coburg Library last year.  (Yarn bombing is soooooooooooooooooooo subversive, you guys!)  Some of the stuff, like knitted flowers loosely tied to tree branches, was really cool. 
Most of it was … not.  You had your trees wearing legwarmers, which messes up the lives of the organisms living in or on the trunk, and can cause rot if the wool is left to get damp and mildewy.  It also interferes with photosynthesis in some species. 
Then there were the gross, mildewed layers of wool on the bike racks.  I wasn’t a cyclist at the time, but I saw a lot of people going out of their way to avoid those racks.  And parking places for bikes are finite!  Not to mention that most of the posts around the library were also wearing blankets. 
Most annoying of all, for me, was the fact that all the seating provided for the elderly and disabled — and there are a lot of elderly people in that suburb — was covered in wet, mouldy wool.  Sucks if you’re in poor health and need a nice sit!  
I mean, I was only mildly annoyed at the time, but right now, being in the middle of a nasty rheumatoid/fibro flare-up, I’d be ropeable if the only options for resting were (a) covered in wet wool or (b) owned by businesses that expect you, not unreasonably, to buy their products in exchange for using their chairs. 
…I wonder if there’s a statute of limitations on writing angry letters to council? 
IN CONCLUSION, I hate yarn bombing.  It is bad and people shouldn’t do it.  It’s also so very tied up in gentrification that I feel like an actually subversive application of knitting skills would be to make blankets and knitwear for homeless people, or refugees, or poor people.  

And this is all a pretty damning counterargument to all the people who say they like yarn bombing more than typical graffitti because it’s less damaging/permanent. They like it because it’s associated with nice, non threatening middle class establishment types. 
What I don’t get about councils paying for it: why not just paint those things? I don’t know how trees feel about being painted(*) but poles and benches and stuff could often do with some nice cheery colours, and it wouldn’t interfere with their usefulness. 
(*) googling “painting trees” was unhelpful haha

I hate yarn-bombing because the first time I saw it was in a park next to the downtown courthouse and across from Seattle’s busiest (and sketchiest) homeless shelter. That park is full of homeless people, all day every day. If the shelter is at capacity, people sleep in that park. So, the first time I saw yarn-bombing, I saw people sleeping under trees that were better dressed than they were. And fuck that.

Yup.
I was invited to help yarn bomb something, brought this up and was uninvited for harshing their yarn squee.

plus, the types of people who do yarn bombing (i can only assume white and middle to upper class) aren’t gonna get caught doing it and probably wouldn’t suffer very harsh consequences even if they did.  it’s kind of a form of appropriation (maybe?) because think about who graffiti/street art is associated with and how much trouble they get in when they get caught

fascinating and important commentary

wow this is really eye-opening

i want to add also that yarn-bombing usually uses cheap ass acrylic yarn which is, yknow, a synthetic fiber made of plastic. hence the word “acrylic”. it will not biodegrade in any reasonable timeframe. so it’s littering. it’s putting fucking plastic on and around trees, exactly the same as tying a fucking shopping bag to them, and walking away. fuck you.

3liza:

xxxemoghoul69xxx:

markusbones:

xemoboyfriendx:

nudiemuse:

bedbugsbiting:

sqbr:

squiddishly:

squiddishly:

yiduiqie:

isabelthespy:

rgr-pop:

isabelthespy:

noplaceforhatefucking:

fuckyeahcraft:

Yarn Bombed (by RhubarbPatch)

Some lovely cheerful yarn bombing!

Ugh, guys, don’t do this, never do this, some person or people yarn bomb periodically all over my fucking neighborhood and never come back and check on their shit and now there’s just faded, raveling, mouldering yarn clumps on lampposts and fenceposts and trees that mostly looked just fine before being “reclaimed” and it makes me embarrassed about how grungy and derelict, say, the lot on my corner, or the sidewalk up the block, now seems

(also, the posts and poles used to be available for posters and fliers and now aren’t because guess what you can’t tape a show or sale poster to the fucking gross mildewed yarn things, so you’ve actually decreased useful community space, thanks so much)

never not reblogging yarn bombing hate

who the fuck can even afford to abandon that much yarn, yarn is like one of the less cheap craft supplies, to me yarnbombing is a form of conspicuous consumption like lawns and truffle fries (except not like truffle fries because truffle fries are fucking cool)

literally never not reblogging yarn bombing hate/this is another really really good point, even if this is like lion’s brand acrylic that adds up a lot for one of those trees much less all of them

i loathe yarn bombing, so +1. 

in australia a lot of yarn bombing takes place on private property, so i wonder if that contributes to the fact that i haven’t seen any gross decaying yarn bombs?

I’ve seen plenty of decaying yarnbombing around the northern end of Coburg.  It’s gross and wasteful.  And, to reiterate, bad for trees.

FURTHER THOUGHTS REGARDING MY HATRED OF YARN BOMBING, because I just angrily ate my breakfast and remembered this: 

So, Moreland City Council sponsored a yarn bombing thing outside the Coburg Library last year.  (Yarn bombing is soooooooooooooooooooo subversive, you guys!)  Some of the stuff, like knitted flowers loosely tied to tree branches, was really cool. 

Most of it was … not.  You had your trees wearing legwarmers, which messes up the lives of the organisms living in or on the trunk, and can cause rot if the wool is left to get damp and mildewy.  It also interferes with photosynthesis in some species. 

Then there were the gross, mildewed layers of wool on the bike racks.  I wasn’t a cyclist at the time, but I saw a lot of people going out of their way to avoid those racks.  And parking places for bikes are finite!  Not to mention that most of the posts around the library were also wearing blankets. 

Most annoying of all, for me, was the fact that all the seating provided for the elderly and disabled — and there are a lot of elderly people in that suburb — was covered in wet, mouldy wool.  Sucks if you’re in poor health and need a nice sit!  

I mean, I was only mildly annoyed at the time, but right now, being in the middle of a nasty rheumatoid/fibro flare-up, I’d be ropeable if the only options for resting were (a) covered in wet wool or (b) owned by businesses that expect you, not unreasonably, to buy their products in exchange for using their chairs. 

…I wonder if there’s a statute of limitations on writing angry letters to council? 

IN CONCLUSION, I hate yarn bombing.  It is bad and people shouldn’t do it.  It’s also so very tied up in gentrification that I feel like an actually subversive application of knitting skills would be to make blankets and knitwear for homeless people, or refugees, or poor people.  

And this is all a pretty damning counterargument to all the people who say they like yarn bombing more than typical graffitti because it’s less damaging/permanent. They like it because it’s associated with nice, non threatening middle class establishment types. 

What I don’t get about councils paying for it: why not just paint those things? I don’t know how trees feel about being painted(*) but poles and benches and stuff could often do with some nice cheery colours, and it wouldn’t interfere with their usefulness. 

(*) googling “painting trees” was unhelpful haha

I hate yarn-bombing because the first time I saw it was in a park next to the downtown courthouse and across from Seattle’s busiest (and sketchiest) homeless shelter. That park is full of homeless people, all day every day. If the shelter is at capacity, people sleep in that park. So, the first time I saw yarn-bombing, I saw people sleeping under trees that were better dressed than they were. And fuck that.

Yup.

I was invited to help yarn bomb something, brought this up and was uninvited for harshing their yarn squee.

plus, the types of people who do yarn bombing (i can only assume white and middle to upper class) aren’t gonna get caught doing it and probably wouldn’t suffer very harsh consequences even if they did.  it’s kind of a form of appropriation (maybe?) because think about who graffiti/street art is associated with and how much trouble they get in when they get caught

fascinating and important commentary

wow this is really eye-opening

i want to add also that yarn-bombing usually uses cheap ass acrylic yarn which is, yknow, a synthetic fiber made of plastic. hence the word “acrylic”. it will not biodegrade in any reasonable timeframe. so it’s littering. it’s putting fucking plastic on and around trees, exactly the same as tying a fucking shopping bag to them, and walking away. fuck you.

giddytf2:

They’re so cute I want to go kaboom.

giddytf2:

They’re so cute I want to go kaboom.

tastefullyoffensive:

Perfect form. [x]

revstrychninetwitch:

ineffable-hufflepuff:

booksandwildthings:

backdoorteenmom:

regiinamills:

xxmickeydxx:

This is how many children that died in their Hunger Games, without even being mentioned throughout the three books. All these children were under 18. All these children had parents. All these parents’ hearts sank to their knees during their child’s reaping. All these parents saw their terrified child off at the train station. All these parents heard the sound that signified their child’s death. All these parents received their cold, dead child in a wooden box. All these parents’ lives ended there. All these parents could say or do nothing. All these parents were merely thanked that they gave up their child. Thanked.

And the media focuses on the love triangle.

All these children and all these parents aren’t real

Yeah, sure, I guess that’s true. None of these people were real.
But let’s focus on what this series, and this fact, say about our society.
In the series, the Capitol’s media focuses entirely on the ‘fun’ of the Games- the fashion, the plot twists, the favorites, the strategies, the romance. And the entire time, they completely overlook the fact that 1,678 children between the ages of 12 and 18 have died. Usually brutally murdered by other 12 to 18 year old children.
And how does our real-life media react to this story when news of a movie adaptation reaches them? They talk about the romance. This tragic story of a girl who must choose between her long-time best friend and her new love. Even if she chooses Peeta, they still must fight to the death. The star-crossed lovers of District 12. And many readers of the original novels saw the books through the same lens. You would tell them that you read/ were reading the books and their first reaction was, “Are you Team Gale or Team Peeta?”
Meanwhile, children are fighting to the death.
The fact that our media, and many every-day people reacted to the Hunger Games the same as the Capitol media scares me.
I don’t want this world to be anything like the Capitol. I don’t think any of us do.
And the fact that most of us (including myself) never really considered how many children had died in the games also scares me. But, hey, it didn’t happen now/ in the current story, so it doesn’t matter, right?

I’m not sure about that math though. I think it’s MORE.
Let’s talk about just the first 73 games, ok? Every year before Katniss and Peta. 
24 Tributes (1 girl + 1 boy x 12 districts)= 1 Victor + 23 Dead Every year
23 x 73 = 1,697
EXCEPT, the 50th games (The games Haymitch competed in) had DOUBLE the number of tributes. An extra 24 kids died that year.
1,703. 
Now, 22 kids died in Katniss and Peeta’s first game, because they both live.
1,725. 
In 74 years, the brutal, violent murders of 1,725 children aired on TV in Panem, and in both the Capitol, and on the red carpet in our world, the first question people want to ask it “Team Peeta?” Damn.

i’m not even in this fandom, but damn, that’s scary

revstrychninetwitch:

ineffable-hufflepuff:

booksandwildthings:

backdoorteenmom:

regiinamills:

xxmickeydxx:

This is how many children that died in their Hunger Games, without even being mentioned throughout the three books. All these children were under 18. All these children had parents. All these parents’ hearts sank to their knees during their child’s reaping. All these parents saw their terrified child off at the train station. All these parents heard the sound that signified their child’s death. All these parents received their cold, dead child in a wooden box. All these parents’ lives ended there. All these parents could say or do nothing. All these parents were merely thanked that they gave up their child. Thanked.

And the media focuses on the love triangle.

All these children and all these parents aren’t real

Yeah, sure, I guess that’s true. None of these people were real.

But let’s focus on what this series, and this fact, say about our society.

In the series, the Capitol’s media focuses entirely on the ‘fun’ of the Games- the fashion, the plot twists, the favorites, the strategies, the romance. And the entire time, they completely overlook the fact that 1,678 children between the ages of 12 and 18 have died. Usually brutally murdered by other 12 to 18 year old children.

And how does our real-life media react to this story when news of a movie adaptation reaches them? They talk about the romance. This tragic story of a girl who must choose between her long-time best friend and her new love. Even if she chooses Peeta, they still must fight to the death. The star-crossed lovers of District 12. And many readers of the original novels saw the books through the same lens. You would tell them that you read/ were reading the books and their first reaction was, “Are you Team Gale or Team Peeta?”

Meanwhile, children are fighting to the death.

The fact that our media, and many every-day people reacted to the Hunger Games the same as the Capitol media scares me.

I don’t want this world to be anything like the Capitol. I don’t think any of us do.

And the fact that most of us (including myself) never really considered how many children had died in the games also scares me. But, hey, it didn’t happen now/ in the current story, so it doesn’t matter, right?

I’m not sure about that math though. I think it’s MORE.

Let’s talk about just the first 73 games, ok? Every year before Katniss and Peta. 

24 Tributes (1 girl + 1 boy x 12 districts)= 1 Victor + 23 Dead Every year

23 x 73 = 1,697

EXCEPT, the 50th games (The games Haymitch competed in) had DOUBLE the number of tributes. An extra 24 kids died that year.

1,703. 

Now, 22 kids died in Katniss and Peeta’s first game, because they both live.

1,725. 

In 74 years, the brutal, violent murders of 1,725 children aired on TV in Panem, and in both the Capitol, and on the red carpet in our world, the first question people want to ask it “Team Peeta?” Damn.

i’m not even in this fandom, but damn, that’s scary

(Source: katnusspls)

mauesartetc:

So this is where my Sunday went. CLOUDS AND GRADIENTS EVERYWHERE

mauesartetc:

So this is where my Sunday went. CLOUDS AND GRADIENTS EVERYWHERE

libraryoftheancients:

openinkstand:

Inky paw prints presumably left by a curious kitty on a 15th century manuscript.
From National Geographic.

#this will forever be the funniest thing to me #that poor scribe just #GOD DAMN IT CAT #CANST THOU NOT SEE I AM AT WORK #ge-GET OFF YE BEAST #THOU HAST RUINED IT #NO THOU DOST NOT RECIEVE SCRATCHIES
(via)

libraryoftheancients:

openinkstand:

Inky paw prints presumably left by a curious kitty on a 15th century manuscript.

From National Geographic.

#this will forever be the funniest thing to me #that poor scribe just #GOD DAMN IT CAT #CANST THOU NOT SEE I AM AT WORK #ge-GET OFF YE BEAST #THOU HAST RUINED IT #NO THOU DOST NOT RECIEVE SCRATCHIES

(via)